Nice Twitter Summary of @PopUpNewsroom Presentation

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Here’s journo Christopher Mele’s live Tweeting of my presentation at the National Newspaper Association in Phoenix last weekend.  And, yes, due to a technical glitch, I did engage in some impromptu dancing with U of Kentucky’s Al Cross.

Pop-Up Newsroom @ World Journalism Education Congress

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I’ll be presenting a paper about the Pop-Up Newsroom in a couple of weeks in Belgium.  You can watch an audio slideshow (by our students Sisi Chen and Jing Wang) explaining the first stage of the project below. The part of the  spring semester iteration of the project in which 45 students spent 12 hours reporting for Pop-Up Newsroom from long-distance bus stations in Los Angeles will be out in an iBook later this summer.

Does the power of a dramatic image depend upon how fast it gets distributed?

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Because I’ve been writing a paper about how a visual image – a video – of an Ethiopian domestic worker being beaten in Beirut went viral last spring, I was fascinated by this AP graphic available on Visually. It shows how photojournalist Malcolm Browne’s iconic images of the self-immolating monk in 1963 Vietnam traveled to publication in the US.

It took 15 hours for the images to reach the US and even then the most famous image was not initially the first one used. Today, would the image even come from a professional photographer? Or would citizen journalists (“witnesses”) have been the ones to document the event? Would that matter?

The New Information Ecosystem Created by Citizen Journalism in Syria

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I’ve been busy toiling away on a study of the rise of a new media ecology within Syria that’s grown out of the conflict there, enabled by social media and other digital technologies.  I’ll be presenting this research at the end of the month at the IAMCR (International Association for Media and Communication Research) conference in Dublin. The screenshot below from the online front page of the NYT is just another example of how the traditional, mainstream media rely on citizen reporters for information about the conflict.
CItizen Journalism from Syria

Social Media Go to War: Rage, Rebellion and Revolution in the Age of Twitter

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This new 543867_281825641945730_1261022346_nbook includes a chapter co-authored by Treepon Kirdnark, an alum of our MA program, on Thailand’s Red Shirt Uprising and YouTube.  Other chapters cover social media and dissent in countries ranging from Cuba to Georgia and, of course, a number of pieces on the Arab Spring by authors such as Catherine Cassara and Lara  Lengel, Sadaf Ali and Shahira Fahmy, Elizabeth  Iskander and Mina Monir,  Naila Hamdy and Lindsey Conlin and more.